Make Money Scrapbooking #5: Teach at Your Local Store

by Lain Ehmann on May 20, 2010

Classes sell product. Teachers teach classes. Therefore, teachers sell product! And teachers can make money teaching scrapbooking if they play their cards right.

This is probably the money I SPENT scrapbooking, but that's okay, too.

If you have a scrapbook store anywhere within driving distance of your home, you’re in an enviable position. Stores need teachers to instruct their customers on how to use the latest tools, how to design the latest looks, and how to create basic pages. The next time you’re in the store, grab a copy of the class calendar and see what’s currently being offered, as well as what the class prices are like.

Store classes usually fall into one of three categories: Product classes, project classes, or technique classes.

Product classes showcase the latest and greatest products in the store, often in new and unique ways. Think of when Tim Holtz’s Grungeboard first came out — classes everywhere were showing people fun and different ways to use it on their pages.

Project classes are all about the finished project. Think six cards in an hour, an adorable Christmas album, or a Grandma’s brag book.

Technique classes are where you teach people to achieve a certain effect, like embossing, flocking, distressing, using a binding machine, etc. You’ll still be leading them through a project or two, but the point is more about the process being taught.

Once you’ve got the lay of the land, you can see where your skills and interests might meld with the store’s needs.

Great for: Much like teaching scrapbooking though your rec department, teaching through your store is perfect if you’re a “people” person.

Drawbacks: You usually must stay one step ahead of the curve, coming up with fresh ideas to entice customers to take your class.

Earning potential: I’ve been paid on a per-person basis and on a flat-fee basis; both are common. Expect to make at least $10 per person above and beyond the supplies for a 2-hour class.

Suggestions: Think like a store owner when proposing classes. What products would she like to sell, but people are having trouble using? What new (and expensive!) tool can you encourage people to invest in? A class on journaling may be popular, but convincing people to buy an archival-quality pen isn’t going to do much for the store’s bottom line.

The series is complete! View it all here:

Did you miss the other entries in this series?

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #1: It’s Party Time!

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #2: Submit!

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #3: Teach Through Your Rec Department

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #4: Affiliate Programs

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #5: Teach at Your Local Store

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #6: Scrapbook for Wedding Vendors

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #7: Sell Your Own Kits

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #8: Work for a Manufacturer’s Demonstrator

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #9: Design for Your Local Store

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #10: Sell Greeting Cards

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #11: Sell Your Designs Online

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #12: Work at Tradeshows

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #13: Create Digital Products

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #14: Scrapbook for Businesses

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #15: Get Paid per Page

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #16: Design for Manufacturers

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #17: Become a Direct Seller Rep

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #18: Design for a Kit Club

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #19: Sell at Craft Faires

Make Money Scrapbooking Idea #20: Write About It!

P.S. If you liked this series, you may want to check out the class I taught at True Scrap II in October on making money from your scrapbooking. It’s available here.

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